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NSClient++ despite its name is most often used in server mode responding to remote calls via either NRPE or check_nt. The closest thing to a client we get in normal mode of operation is NSCA where we submit data back. But NSClient++ can act as a client as well which is not just something I use for unit testing but something which can actually be useful in your monitoring environment.

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NRPE is a common easy to use option for monitoring remote machines from Nagios or Icinga. Unfortunately NRPE, with **out of the box setup,* is not what I would consider secure.*

This tutorial looks at how you can secure your NRPE traffic by using NSClient++ both as a client and server (yes it runs on Linux as well) in conjunction with SSL certificates to provide certificate based authentication.

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Stateful scripts are a simple yet powerfully way to enhance your monitoring which I think is used far to little. Using stateful script you can easily add simple predictions and change management. This is very easy to accomplished using NSClient++ as its built-in scripting modules by default provides stateful scripts (in contrast to Nagios and Icinga which tends to be stateless). This tutorial will walk you through writing a simple stateful script in Lua. If you are still confused about stateful scripts the main benefit is that they remember things. Thus you can alert when something changes as well as predict the future. A good example of this is disk growth prediction but there are a lot of other scenarios where they are useful.

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Time for yet another tutorial this time detailing how to monitoring log files both event log and regular text files. The event log parts will build a bit on the earlier posts on monitoring the event log but since the “event log cache” feature has been replaced by the generic SimpleCache in 0.4.1 as well as 0.4.1 introducing a new SimpleFileWriter module as well  I felt it was time to re-visit this topic.

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On OSMC 2012 I presented NSClient++ 0.4.1 not really presenting new features as such but more focusing on how to use the new version of NSClient++. In addition to explain various parts of the new Agent I did some demos which of course does not show very well in the slides so here I have presented the demos in a bit more details. I have also, in the slides, elaborated a bit more to at least give the commands I used. Slides can be found here.

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As always Netways arranged for the yearly Open Source Monitoring Conference in Nürenburg.  As always I was suckered into coming.

I had originally planned not to come but alas since my planned vacation was postponed I decided on going. This is a short review of the sessions I attended and my impressions of the conference as a whole.

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Take your monitoring to the next level by creating self-resetting event log checks. Sometimes it is not only faults which can be harvested from the windows event log many applications will also report a message when the state returns to normal. This tutorial show you how to configure NSClient++ 0.4.1 to setup auto resetting event log checks. In addition to using passive checks via NSCA I will also demonstrate how to use the Cache module to benefit from real time event log checks via NRPE.

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Well, since I got an email from Würth Phoenix asking me to plug their conference Which has been renamed again this year calling itself Open Source System Management Conference 2012. Ironically enough they forgot to include the link making it a bit difficult to give some information but a quick google reviled this page http://www.wuerth-phoenix.com/en/company/event/nagios-event/. Since I figured it would be a dreadfully short blog post with just a single conference I figured I’d mention the other once I know about as well.

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Monitoring the event log can quickly become straining for both the computer as well as the administrator as the event log grows and grows. To make this simpler for both the administrator and the computer NSClient++ 0.4.0 introduced real-time event log monitoring. This means we no longer scan the event log instead we simply scan events as they come in. The benefit, in addition to lowering the resources required, is that we can also get notified instantly when an error occurs instead of every 5 minutes or however often we check the log. Another addition is a simple client o generate event log message to help administrators debug event log filters. This is a quick introduction to event log monitoring and real-time event log monitoring showing how to set up real-time event log monitoring both for active and passive use via NSCA and NRPE.